19 NOV 2018

Mid-Century Architecture in Focus – The Liberal Catholic Church of St. Francis (1964, Grafton)

Visiting a small but perfectly formed mid-century building by Jack Patterson.


Words and Photography by Dan Eagle

This small, intriguing and very angular building was designed by the relatively obscure architect Jack Patterson in 1964. Patterson attended Waitaki Boys High in Omaru in the 1920s before gaining a degree in Architecture from Auckland University in the 30s. Time spent working locally with celebrated European Avant Garde architect Imi Porsolt gave Patterson an international perspective.

Patterson served in the Navy during WW2 and then did an Architecture Bursary in London and gained work experience there before returning to New Zealand. This compact but sophisticated church is an elegant example of Patterson’s work in New Zealand. It features a memorable, geometrically pitched roof, generous use of glass and open space with textured brick detailing.

Patterson also designed residential homes throughout Auckland so there must be some hidden gems waiting to be rediscovered amongst the suburbs.


More inspiration you might like

Celebrating 100 Years of Hans Olsen

Mr. Bigglesworthy is proud to celebrate the work of legendary Danish designer Hans Olsen. We look back through our collecting history and reflect on some new developments from his range of classic furniture from Warm Nordic.

READ MORE

Alexander Calder: Radical Inventor at the NGV

The most impressive Calder work we've seen in our travels is in Chicago, "Flamingo" (1974). It's not traditionally attractive but it's definitely memorable and like great art, the more you find out about the artist and their work, the more it grows on you.

READ MORE

MONA – Refreshingly Irreverent and Dark

If we had several hundred million dollars we'd definitely consider starting a museum.

READ MORE

Good Form Event 'Luminary'

Our design store for new products, Good Form, is proud to celebrate two years in business with the launch of 'Luminary', an event and exhibition focused on designer lighting.

READ MORE
SITE BY EMMA EAGLE