26 MAR 2017

Vanished Delft – Exhibition at Pah Homestead

Mr. Bigglesworthy is proud to be associated with Vanished Delft – Handmade Material Culture, the current exhibition at Pah Homestead.

We highly recommend a visit to Vanished Delft, which runs until May 14. Curator Anna Miles, in conjunction with the Wallace Arts Trust, has created a potent intersection and conversation between the grandness of the Homestead itself and the contemporary applied art and craft within. Each space displays a combination of unexpected and thought provoking works by an extensive list of artists. The exhibition also features three rugs by Simon Ogden and Gavin Chilcott – New Zealand artists who have worked with Dilana, one of our stocked brands.

While you're at Pah Homestead, don't miss the chance to stop for coffee and brunch at the world class café, or wander through the superbly groomed gardens which house some of the large outdoor sculptures that the Trust has collected.

Gavin Chilcott Thames Rug for Dilana


Simon Ogden 9 Graces No. 2 Rug for Dilana



Main image features Simon Ogden Blue Moon Rising Rug for gallery

Photography by Sam Hartnett

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